MagnifyMoney.com: What to Do When You Owe Taxes to the IRS
As published in the blog MagnifyMoney.com
 4/12/2017

Scott Taylor, CPA was featured in a recent post on MagnifyMoney.com about what to do when you owe money to the IRS. Taylor gives suggestions for how to establish a payment plan to the IRS, with other details in the full article that you can read on their site:

Enroll in an IRS repayment plan

Paying a tax debt via credit card may not be an option if the amount due exceeds your credit limit, or it may not be the best choice if your credit card has a high interest rate. In that case, you may be able to work out a payment arrangement with the IRS. Just be aware that your account will continue to accrue penalties and interest until the balance is paid in full.

Here are three types of IRS repayment plans:

Short-term extension to pay

If the amount you owe is relatively small and you believe you can pay it off within 120 days, call the IRS and ask for a short-term extension of time to pay. This is not a formal payment plan. The IRS will just make a note on your account that you’ve been granted additional time to pay the full amount. During this period, they will not take any collection action against you.

Installment agreement

If you aren’t able to pay your debt in full within 120 days, Scott Taylor, a CPA with Piercy Bowler Taylor & Kern in Las Vegas, Nev., recommends that you contact the IRS to arrange an installment agreement. An installment agreement is basically a monthly payment plan. You can apply online for an installment agreement if you owe $50,000 or less in combined tax, penalties, and interest. For balances over that amount, you will need to complete Form 9465 and Form 433-F and send them in by mail.

With an installment agreement, you decide how much money you will pay each month and on what date you’ll make the payment. As long as your debt will be paid off within three years and you owe less than $10,000, the IRS has to accept your payment plan.

Fees

Keep in mind that the IRS also charges user fees for installment agreements. “Unfortunately for taxpayers, the fees have gone up as of January 2017,” Taylor says. The cost to set up an installment agreement is $225. If you apply online and choose to have the monthly payments directly debited from a bank account, the fee drops to $31.

If your ability to pay the agreed upon amount changes later on, you’ll need to call the IRS immediately. When you miss a payment, your agreement goes into default and the IRS can start taking collection action. For example, if your agreement calls for a $300 payment and you lose your job and aren’t able to make the payment, call the IRS before you miss a payment. They may be able to reduce your monthly payment amount to reflect your current financial situation.

What if you don’t agree with the amount due?

If you owe a lot more than you expected, take a moment to review your completed return carefully to look for errors. Make sure you didn’t accidentally enter the same income twice or forget an important deduction, and make sure you answered all of the questions correctly. One missed question or checkbox can cause you to miss out on valuable tax benefits. Also, compare this year’s return to last year. If your tax bill went up drastically even though your situation hasn’t really changed, find out why.

Occasionally, taxpayers receive notices from the IRS indicating an amount due that they don’t agree with. Don’t feel like you have to pay an amount you don’t believe you owe just because it comes on IRS letterhead. Taylor says each notice will include a section detailing how to respond.

“The IRS may have made an error in matching up 1099s or W-2s, and the amount owed needs to be adjusted,” he says, and he recommends that you send a letter via certified mail in response, with a full explanation. “A CPA can help you with this letter, but if you follow the guidelines provided by the IRS, you should be able to respond appropriately and have the fees resolved or adjusted.”

IRS collection enforcement

If your taxes are not paid on time and you do not communicate with the IRS, they can issue a Notice of Levy. An IRS levy permits the legal seizure of your property. They may garnish your wages or seize your bank account, vehicles, real estate, or other personal property to satisfy the debt.

Taylor says IRS notices will only come via U.S. mail, so be sure you check your mail and read all IRS notices. “It seems like a simple thing,” Taylor says, “but with many financial and personal transactions occurring online, many people ignore their mailbox for long periods of time.”

Whatever your situation, Taylor says it’s important to remain in contact with the IRS to show your intent is to pay your debt. “Don’t ever ignore IRS notices,” Taylor says. “The IRS is willing to coordinate payment plans, and the consequences of ignoring them are always difficult to adjust.”

Read the full article here.